Community and Integration in Pacoima

Photograph article dated August 3, 1963 partially reads, "A Valley integration leader says there is much that local chambers of commerce and service clubs could do if they seriously wanted to aid desegregation in the Valley. "But no one has offered any help to us. There is a lot they could do, but they haven't made the effort," says Georgia Taylor, president of the Valley chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Mrs. Taylor, a 38-year-old Negro who lives with her husband and five children in an almost completely Negro neighborhood in Pacoima, has a project that she says chambers of commerce and service clubs could handle. A major problem in the Valley, she holds, is the fact that many Southern Negros and whites have come to California bringing their segregation practices with them." Photo by Gordon Dean.

Photograph article dated August 3, 1963 partially reads, “A Valley integration leader says there is much that local chambers of commerce and service clubs could do if they seriously wanted to aid desegregation in the Valley. “But no one has offered any help to us. There is a lot they could do, but they haven’t made the effort,” says Georgia Taylor, president of the Valley chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Mrs. Taylor, a 38-year-old Negro who lives with her husband and five children in an almost completely Negro neighborhood in Pacoima, has a project that she says chambers of commerce and service clubs could handle. A major problem in the Valley, she holds, is the fact that many Southern Negros and whites have come to California bringing their segregation practices with them.” Photo by Gordon Dean.

The rise in jobs during the growth of manufacturing and defense industries post World War II brought many African Americans to the Valley, but racial discrimination in the newly built suburban housing developments kept neighborhoods segregated. A large and active African American community formed in Pacoima. In 1960, 90% of the nearly 10,000 African Americans in the Valley lived in there. Community involvement in churches and the local chapter of the NAACP forged opportunities for youth, integration and fair housing practices.

 

 

 

 

 

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